Trade justice

War on Want has a long history of campaigning for trade justice. Most recently, we have been at the forefront of EU and UK campaigning against the controversial EU-USA and EU-Canada ‘new generation’ trade deals, TTIP and CETA.

Informed by our experience of working on these deals alongside our long history of working alongside our partners in the global South, we believe that to create trade justice we must adhere to key principles which apply to any trade deals we negotiate.

While some of these principles will apply directly to some deals more than others, we believe them to all be fundamental to ensuring trade justice.

Key principles for trade justice

 

·        The global South: In line with international commitments, Southern countries must be free to choose policies to grow sustainably and inclusively: they must not be forced into commodity dependence, prevented from industrialising or holding sovereignty over their own natural resources. Trade policies must also align to international climate change commitments.

·         Social, health, environmental protections: Rules to protect and safeguard society and the environment – in particular around food safety, banking regulations and climate change - must be upheld in trade negotiations and not seen as mere ‘non-tariff barriers’ to trade.

·         Protect the NHS and public services: The privatisation of public services, including the NHS, must not be mandated by any trade deals: trade deals must not restrict the ability of governments to run public services wholly in the public interest, nor should they inhibit governments from renationalising public services. 

·         No ‘corporate courts’: Equality before the law must be upheld, with governments guaranteed their right to regulate. Privileged legal systems for foreign investors – e.g., ISDS, the ‘reformed’ Investor Court System (ICS) found in CETA, or the proposed Multilateral Investment Court (MIC) – must not be included in any trade deal. 

·         Workers’ rights / human rights: Trade deals must not inhibit the ability of states to realise international human rights and labour rights obligations.

·         Democracy and transparency: Parliamentary processes must be in place to ensure the highest standards of democracy and transparency in trade negotiations and ratification.

Latest news

Government challenged to rule out 'corporate courts'

30 July 2019 - 7:30am

Government challenged to rule out ‘corporate courts’ after Brexit, following criticism by influential MPs

  • Trade Committee calls investment rules ‘hugely controversial’ ahead of possible no deal Brexit
  • Armenia is latest country to be threatened, with $2 billion claim by mining company Lydian over Amulsar gold mine
  • New 18-minute documentary charts story of resistance to international mining industry in Amulsar
Read more

Liam Fox 'in denial' over huge public concern at post-Brexit trade deals

18 July 2019 - 11:15am

600,000 submissions to public consultation ‘essentially ignored’, say campaigners

Read more

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The Armenian government just green-lit a toxic gold mine. We went to the Embassy in London to say, Amulsar should r… https://t.co/qEzyh0cjtm 34 min 49 sec ago
The Armenian government just green-lit a toxic gold mine. We went to the Embassy in London to say, Amulsar should r… https://t.co/BYxZmH42iu 2 hours 47 min ago
The Armenian government gave the go-ahead for a toxic gold mine on Amulsar Mountain, caving to pressure and the thr… https://t.co/zUZqcvmv6r 21 hours 11 min ago