UNIQLO caves to campaign pressure and publishes factory list

1 March 2017 - 11:00pm
Press release

In October 2016, War on Want and Hong Kong based partner SACOM launched a campaign demanding the Japanese fashion giant, UNIQLO release the list of factory suppliers. Yesterday UNIQLO caved to the mounting pressure and published their list of 146 core factory suppliers across seven countries in Asia.

War on Want’s explosive report, This way to dystopia, exposed factory conditions in UNIQLO’s Chinese factories revealed through SACOM’s undercover investigations. The report showed serious labour rights abuses taking place across all factories – forced overtime, dangerous working conditions, hours of up to 20 hours, and a culture of verbal abuse and bullying.

This raised serious concern for workers producing across their supply chain however with no access to the names and locations of these factories, it has been impossible for workers and unions to reach out to other workers until today.

Thulsi Narayanasamy, War on Want Senior Programmes Officer said, “This win is shared by workers who spoke out and organised to resist UNIQLO’s exploitation in factories, unions that supported them and our partner SACOM in Hong Kong that spearheaded a coalition of international solidarity”.

“This is a lesson for UNIQLO. They might have an international network of factories, but garment workers have an international network of people who stand in solidarity with them and have shown that they are prepared to act in support of them”.

The release of UNIQLO’s factory list comes on the heels of pressure from campaign groups and unions to take responsibility for a group of almost 4000 workers who lost their jobs in Indonesia when their factory that produced for UNIQLO was closed. Workers are still owed 4 months of unpaid wages and their severance benefits totalling over $10 million.

“UNIQLO must stop leaving a trail of rights abuses wherever they make their clothes. Other brands have stepped up to take responsibility for these workers who are in a desperate situation and UNIQLO once again are turning a blind eye.”

Notes to editors

For more information and interviews contact Ross Hemingway +44 (0)7983 550 728 or Thulsi Narayanasamy +44 (0)7724 580885

 

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