'Heartless' stores in Valentine storm

14 February 2008 - 10:20am
Press release

Supermarkets today are branded 'heartless' over exploiting overseas workers who face poor wages, health problems and job insecurity supplying flowers sold as Valentine's Day gifts in Britain.

The accusation comes from War on Want, which says many employees in Kenya and Colombia have seen no improvement in their pay and conditions a year since the anti-poverty charity reported widespread abuses in the cut flowers sector.

New research shows Kenyan and Colombian staff toiling up to 14 hours a day preparing flowers for Valentine's Day for less than half a living wage - too little to meet the costs of food, housing and healthcare. In Kenya workers at smallholdings which export their flowers through larger farms receive on average only £20 a month, or less than 10p an hour.

A third of all blooms sold in Europe come from Kenya, while many UK supermarkets are also increasing their imports from Colombia's cut flower farms.

Most of the employees in Kenya and Colombia are single mothers, struggling to raise children with one income.

Many staff engaged in repeated tasks and exposed to pesticides without adequate protection report sickness, including swollen legs, backache, vomiting and chest pains. Employees are more likely to suffer repetitive strain injuries in the run-up to Valentine?s Day as they work longer hours to meet heavier demand.

Casualisation of labour is another problem. Three in four Kenyan staff are on temporary contracts that deny them basic employment rights such as maternity leave.

The findings are based on a report due for publication soon by War on Want?s partner, the Kenya Women Workers? Organisation, and information from the charity?s Colombian partner, Cactus.

Simon McRae, senior campaigns officer at War on Want, said: "British retailers must be heartless in exploiting overseas workers who grow their flowers. These firms have had years to keep their ethical commitments on decent pay and conditions for their suppliers. If Gordon Brown really cares about poor people, he should legislate against this corporate abuse."


NOTE TO EDITORS: Copies of the Kenya Women Workers' Organisation report are available from the War on Want media office. War on Want last March published the report Growing Pains, which detailed poverty wages and health troubles facing Kenyan and Colombian flower workers.

CONTACT: Paul Collins, War on Want media office (+44) (0)20 7549 0584 or (+44) (0)7983 550728

]]>

A Living Wage for Workers

The right to be paid a living wage is a basic entitlement of all working people the world over, whether they work in the public or private sectors, in the global South or North.

Latest news

Celebrating the Grunwick strike 40 years on

20 August 2018 - 1:30pm

It's been 40 years since the Grunwick strike ended. On this day in 1976, six Asian women workers at Grunwick factory walked out in protest over the sacking of a fellow worker. The strikers were challenging racist and sexist abuse, and poverty wages.

Read more

Join the conversation

The lessons from are clear: Only by standing with migrant workers and ending precarious contracts can we… https://t.co/3rx1Gu6zKG 7 hours 6 min ago
Today marks 40 years since the strike started. The lessons are as relevant now as they were then: the lab… https://t.co/Xaw5Ax9uYu 8 hours 1 min ago
No rest breaks, fined for not delivering within fixed windows. Of course employers are putting their pr… https://t.co/sA4G2AaFHE 8 hours 42 min ago