An exhibition by award-winning photographer Tina Remiz, showcasing the daily lives of street vendors and market traders in Zambia struggling for their right to work in the city

  • Tailors working in the street or in street markets, like Susan Nkunde, 53, make everything from wedding dresses to school uniforms to order.
  • Like many traders, Peter Mwamba, 50, works long hours in tough conditions in the hope of a better life for his family.
  • Idan Bwalya, 28, spends her day at this tiny stand selling air time and phone accessories. The majority of traders are women, who generally earn less and face increased harassment.
  • Markets are not only places to buy food and clothes, but a place where you can buy anything you can think of, even beds made right there in the market itself.
  • Leaving school at a young age, Eness Katyekele, 39, did not learn to effectively read and write. Through training provided by War on Want’s partner, the Alliance for Zambia Informal Economy Associations, she has since built these skills and can now manage her business properly.
  • Streets and markets in Zambia are alive with people selling anything and everything from clothes to chickens in order to make ends meet.
  • Living in poverty, many children are unable to attend school and instead trade at the market. Those that can afford an education often trade after school to help with the family finances.
  • With English Premier League football capturing the hearts and minds of Zambians, rows of stalls in any market cater for the fanatics.
  • Widow, Alice Mwansa, 52, sleeps here in the market most nights. Earning less than a £1 a day, she cannot afford the daily bus fare home on top of supporting her children and four orphans – a situation very common in a country with an HIV/AIDS epidemic.
  • Like most traders, Rosemary Mwelwa, 58, lives in over-crowded and squalid conditions. Her family of six lives in a two roomed house, sharing a toilet with five other families.
  • The HIV/AIDS epidemic has left many orphans and widows in its wake. Mary Mwansa, 51, is a widow who supports 14 children selling cabbages. War on Want’s partner, the Alliance for Zambia Informal Economy Associations encourages widows to work together to support one another.
  • Through training from War on Want’s partner, the Alliance for Zambia Informal Economy Associations, on how to manage his market stall, Nethanel Musa, 34, managed to double his monthly profits.
  • War on Want’s partner, the Alliance for Zambia Informal Economy Associations, provides invaluable training improving literacy and numeracy as well as essential skills for work.