New TTIP ‘transparency’ agenda still leaves public in the dark

3 December 2015 - 11:00am
Press release

This week’s concession to create more access to secretive EU-US trade deal documents falls woefully short of any meaningful transparency for the 500 million people of Europe.

An agreement between the European Commission and European Parliament to make key Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP) texts available to all 751 Members of the European Parliament (MEPs) was announced yesterday.

However, national MPs still cannot access TTIP texts. As War on Want revealed last month, plans for national ‘reading rooms’ for TTIP are in fact part of an effort to ensure TTIP information does not leak to the public.

The Brussels deal, a product of intense public pressure, is wholly undermined by the fact that MEPs will still face draconian secrecy measures. Most importantly, MEPs will not be able to share the details of what they read with their constituents or trade experts who can help them understand the documents.

The farce of TTIP ‘transparency’ and the European Commission’s ‘stakeholder engagement’ was highlighted at the last round of negotiations: no negotiators attended the ‘stakeholder outreach’ session where civil society representatives presented their views on the controversial issue of investment protection.

War on Want calls for TTIP negotiations to be stopped immediately.

ENDS

 

Notes for Editors

For further information and interviews, contact John Hilary on +44 7983 550727 or Mark Dearn on +44 7804 289680.

For more information on TTIP, visit: http://www.waronwant.org/what-ttip

More than 3.3 million people across Europe have signed a European Citizens’ Initiative against TTIP. For more information: http://www.waronwant.org/say-no-ttip

Latest news

The Ecologist: President Santos: environmental saint or sinner?

21 November 2017 - 11:00am

President Santos of Colombia recently won two international awards for championing peace and biodiversity despite criticism from campaigners who say he is "encouraging agro-industrial projects that displace local communities", writes Catherine Early at The Ecologist (20 November 2017).

Quoting War on Want's Seb Muñoz, Early writes about the controversies around Santos' contributions, including the issue of displacing indigenous people through destructive extraction industries:

Read more

Rise, Resist, Renew: Alternatives to Mines & Money

20 November 2017 - 4:30pm

Between 25-30 November, we will be hosting frontline activists from Uganda, Philippines and Colombia to challenge the Mines and Money Conference in London – the premier space for the global mining industry and its destructive deals. Our speakers will be sharing stories of resistance, successes and alternatives to mining – and opposing mining violence and current threats from extracitivism in their communities. Join us!

Read more

Join the conversation

Next week: Disrupt the #MinesAndMoney conference in London! Join activists from Uganda, Philippines and Colombia in… https://t.co/nhXFrlcfAJ 9 hours 50 min ago
For the #Tunisian activist, Sabra Chraifa, alternatives to mainstream « development » should not be with less « pol… https://t.co/pMltS0gK6q 12 hours 55 min ago
Our friends @Col_Caravana are hosting a special event to celebrate the work of Colombian Human Rights Defenders!… https://t.co/gpv78712AU 15 hours 17 min ago