War on Want statement on Lee Scott's appointment to Gordon Brown's International Business Advisory Council.

21 March 2006 - 4:02pm
Press release

"When Gordon Brown meets with Lee Scott he could ask him whether he would advise British companies to roll out Asda Wal-Mart's anti-union policies, which recently led to the company being fined almost a ?1million in the north-east for offering illegal inducements to workers to disown their union. The government should take the lead on making its businesses the most socially responsible in the world, not taking advice from a man whose company is an international byword for exploitation."

Mr Mcgregor added: "It's amazing that Gordon Brown is willing to trumpet the fact that he is taking advice from Lee Scott, a chief executive who pays staff low wages yet earned $17.5million in 2004. I hope that he won't listen to Wal-Mart's advice to their own managers earlier this year, to push down medical benefits to staff and the ensure trade union members were kept out of the company."

War on Want's recent report on Asda Wal-Mart exposed how the multinational food giant keeps costs low by demanding ever lower prices from Third World suppliers and restricting union activity in the UK and US, while forcing harsh working regimes on staff. It is available for download at: http://www.waronwant.org/asda


A Living Wage for Workers

The right to be paid a living wage is a basic entitlement of all working people the world over, whether they work in the public or private sectors, in the global South or North.

Latest news

Event: "Curfew" Contemporary dance by El-Funoun & Hawiyya

16 March 2018 - 5:30pm

War on Want is happy to be supporting “Curfew”, a contemporary dance production performed by El-Funoun (Palestine) and Hawiyya Dance Company (UK), presented by Arts Canteen. "Curfew" is a thought-provoking contemporary dance production that encourages individuals to self-reflect and take action in front of injustice.

Read more

Families of massacred workers protest Lonmin’s final AGM tomorrow

13 March 2018 - 12:45pm

Families of massacred workers protest Lonmin’s final AGM tomorrow, saying corporate takeover doesn’t dissolve responsibility of mining company linked to South African president. 

Civil rights activist, bishop and lawyer representing workers at Marikana, South Africa, are in London this week to hold platinum mining company Lonmin to account over 2012 Massacre.

Read more

Join the conversation

Across the UK, people are holding pickets outside local #HSBC branches over the firm’s business with companies sell… https://t.co/q3ykb5EU4h 42 min 42 sec ago
"It is important that the spotlight drawn by the voices of high-profile women also penetrates deeper, to the plight… https://t.co/HLVJSSRMNs 1 hour 8 min ago
Join @GaiaFoundation @Londonmining + visitors from Colombia for a celebration of Water, Land and Life to mark one y… https://t.co/LdtM3NoxLL 1 hour 32 min ago