Rana Plaza: Bangladeshi garment workers still paying the price for fast fashion

22 April 2016 - 11:00am
Press release

On 24 April 2013 the Rana Plaza factory collapsed in Bangladesh killing over 1,100 garment workers and injuring thousands more, in one of the worst industrial tragedies in recent years.

Three years on, the factory owner is in prison, compensation to victims and families has been paid, yet global garment brands continue to profit from exploitation of workers in Bangladesh.

Owen Espley, Sweatshops Campaigner at War on Want, said:

"Three years on from the tragedy of Rana Plaza, garment workers continue to pay a high price making clothes for the UK high street.  It is not enough for consumers to buy ethically, if we’re serious about tackling workers’ rights abuses and the inherent exploitation in the fashion industry, the government has to act; national regulation, alongside legally binding international mechanisms, is long overdue.

"Faced with the grim reality of 14-16 hour days, unsafe conditions and poverty pay, Bangladeshi garment workers are far from hapless victims; they continue to fight every day to improve working conditions, and we must continue to support them in their fight for justice and dignity."

 

Notes to Editors

For more information and to arrange interviews contact Ross Hemingway 07983 550 728

Latest news

BDS is a legitimate means of protest against human rights abuse, says War on Want

14 December 2017 - 12:15pm

Campaigning for BDS is a legitimate means of protest, a fact that has been affirmed time and time again by bodies such as the European Union. It’s effectiveness is one of the main reasons why there is an organised campaign led by the Israeli government to shut it down. Students have every right to use their democratic rights to organise and exercise freedom of expression, and should be applauded for calling out violations of international law and human rights abuse.

Read more

Was it too much to expect the WTO to deliver for women?

14 December 2017 - 12:00pm

Argentina, host for this week’s World Trade Organisation, welcomed hundreds of government representatives to Buenos Aires to negotiate the rules of the global trade in goods, services and ecommerce. Lagging far behind other international fora, the WTO made attempts to draw attention to the impact of trade on gender equality, and correspondingly the impact women’s economic productivity can have on trade.

Read more

Join the conversation

RT @LabourDfID: Join us in Parliament on Monday at 12:30 to watch the second oral evidence session of @KateOsamor's international developme… 8 hours 8 min ago
When your tea towel is big enough to be a banner. Get yours now and send us in creative pics:… https://t.co/R4b4DdONTg 20 hours 2 min ago
Get your holiday gifts in while there's still time with these political products from our online shop.… https://t.co/mr8MA9SY80 1 day 16 hours ago