Fashion brands failure keeps garments workers in danger

12 May 2016 - 7:00am
Press release

It is three years now since the Bangladesh Safety Accord was signed (15 May 2013), following the devastating Rana Plaza factory collapse in Bangladesh which killed over 1100 people.

The Bangladesh Safety Accord is the first legally binding agreement  to hold garment companies to account for the working conditions in their supply chains, and make fashion brands responsible for the human rights abuses that workers face.

Thulsi Narayanasamy, Senior International Programme Officer (Sweatshops & Plantations), said:

“The Bangladesh Safety Accord has been ground-breaking in bringing together unions and brands to create safe workplaces for garment workers, but despite their commitments to making factories safer, fashion brands have failed to act.

“Three years after Rana Plaza, garment workers in Bangladesh making clothes for the UK high street are still working in dangerous conditions. It’s shameful, that while global fashion brands dictate the precise designs of clothes down to the last stitch, they claim to have little power to ensure the basic rights of workers in factories.  The fashion industry is built on this kind of exploitation.

“The time has come for the Accord to use its mandate to ensure workers making our clothes are safe, and brands like H&M are held to account for their ongoing failure to comply.”


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