Community fightback: 'Conga' mining project halted in Peru

19 April 2016 - 8:00am
Press release

Responding to news that Newmont Mining Corporation, the world’s second largest gold miner, has abandoned the notorious ‘Conga’ mining project in northern highlands of Peru, Saranel Benjamin, International Programmes Director, at War on Want, said:

“Two decades of gold and copper extraction in Cajamarca has wrecked land and water sources. For too long the demands of local people have been violently crushed by Peruvian armed forces, defending the interest of the mine owners over those of local communities.

“In the face of violence and intimidation, the people of Cajamarca have stood firm; this victory is testament to their courage and resolve, not least Máxima Acuña de Chaupe who has been at the forefront of the fight to defend their land.”

Máxima Acuña de Chaupe, known as ‘the lakes’s guardian’, has won the prestigious Goldman Environment Prize for the ongoing defence of her territory and the surrounding environment, which includes the sacred Laguna Azul, one of the four mountain lakes of Cajamarca.

Newmont’s existing mining operation in the region, the Yanacocha Mine Corporation, has operated in the Peruvian province of Cajamarca for more than twenty years.

 

Notes to Editors

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